First Library™ Definition

First [furst] - adjective - being before all others

with respect to time, order, rank, importance. 


Li·brar·y [lahy-brer-ee, -bruh-ree, -bree] noun,

plural li·brar·ies - a collection of any materials

for study and enjoyment.

Learn More


Children who are "well-read-to" (at least five times a week), when asked to tell a story, used more literary language than unread to children and they used more sophisticated syntactic forms, longer phrases, and relative clauses. They were also better able to understand the oral and written language of others - an important foundation for the comprehension skills that will develop in the coming years.

Wolf, M. (2007). Proust and the Squds: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. New York: Harper Perennial.



Of all parent-child activities, reading aloud provides the richest exposure to language, so promotion of reading aloud, especially for children from more disadvantaged backgrounds, holds great promise for strengthening school readiness and laying a strong foundation for future educational success.

Reach Out and Read, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Reading Aloud to Children: The Evidence, 2008.

Reading aloud to young children is not only one of the best activities to stimulate language and cognitive skills; it also builds motivation, curiosity, and memory.

Bardige, B. Talk to Me, Baby! (2009), Paul H Brookes Pub Co.


The nurturing and one-on-one attention from parents during reading aloud encourages children to form a positive association with books and reading later in life.

Reach Out and Read, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Reading Aloud to Children: The Evidence, 2008.


Children growing up in homes with an least twenty books get three years more schooling than children from bookless homes, independent of their parents' education, occupation, and class.

Evans, M.D., Kelley, J., & Treiman, D. J. (2010). Family scholarly culture and educational success: Books and schooling in 27 nations. Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, 28(2), 171-197.



The only behavior measure that correlates significantly with reading scores is the number of books in the home.

The Literacy Crisis: False Claims, Real Solutions, 1998


Children who live in print-rich environments and who are read to during the first years of life are much more likely to learn to read on schedule.

Southern Early Childhood Association, "Making Books Part of a Healthy Childhood."



Of all parent-child activities, reading aloud provides the richest exposure to language, so promotion of reading aloud, especially for children from more disadvantaged backgrounds, holds great promise for strengthening school readiness and laying a strong foundation for future educational success.

Reach Out and Read, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Reading Aloud to Children: The Evidence, 2008.



Children who live in print-rich envoronments and who are read to during the first years of life are much more likely to learn to read on schedule.

Southern Early Childhood Association, "Making Books Part of a Healthy Childhood."


Books contain many words that children are unlikely to encounter frequently in spoken language. Children's books actually contain 50% more rare words than primetime television or even college students' conversations.

The Read-Aloud Handbook, by Jim Trelease.


Books contain many words that children are unlikely to encounter frequently in spoken language. Children's books actually contain 50% more rare words than primetime television or even college students' conversations.

The Read-Aloud Handbook, by Jim Trelease.